About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
Journal 17
( more )
STATION
CNBC 60
FBC 50
CSPAN2 26
CNNW 20
CSPAN 12
KQED (PBS) 11
SFGTV2 11
KCSM (PBS) 10
KRCB (PBS) 9
CNN 6
LINKTV 6
SFGTV 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
WTTG 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 279
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 299 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has
spending millions on their campaigns. his people are young and the international and they are not as euro-skeptic as the majority of czechs. >> i'm afraid of many. the european union is doing now. his opinions are a bit more extreme. >> many people seem to be taking his licks in stride or even liking them. as before voting began, their orders to beating up campaign newspapers in the cafes. >> i'm not sure if this is the right guy for a presidency, but he is an interesting one. >> while he attracts all the media attention, there's little interest in the front runners, like the conservative former prime minister who also once headed the office of statistics. we asked the foreign minister if they oppose the establishment. >> i think they are fed up with politicians. >> it is that sentiment that has gotten him this far in the campaign. commentators have called him a potential king-maker. he is not a politician. his latest opera recently premiered and it is a science fiction work in which amphibian's take over the world. they are too clever for the human. they will show that they can also be c
with a crisis on his plate. the dutch finance minister is expected to be named the next head of the euro group later today. the former president is stepping down after eight years on the job. a man replacing him is virtually untested, but he is the only candidate for the job. >> the dutch finance minister looks set to take on an extra job. he has only just become a minister in his own country but he emerged as the candidate from a small country that is a proponent of unpopular budgeting. >> there seems to be a few basis, a new basis for trust, and we have to work to enhance it and strengthen it and to build new growth in jobs on that basis of trust. that is as short as i can say of what needs to be done in the euro group. >> goodbye to the head of the finance minister since 2005. he spent most of his time deal width democratic crisis and says he is eager to understand that over to somebody else. but apart from designating a new head little else of substance is on the agenda. tell leave a pressing decision on a bail out for cyprus until after elections there. >> since i heard the president has
is expected to be named the next head of the euro group later today. the former president is stepping down after eight years on the job. a man replacing him is virtually untested, but he is the only candidate for the job. >> the dutch finance minister looks set to take on an extra job. he has only just become a minister in his own country but he emerged as the candidate from a small country that is a proponent of unpopular budgeting. >> there seems to be a few basis, a new basis for trust, and we have to work to enhance it and strengthen it and to build new growth in jobs on that basis of trust. that is as short as i can say of what needs to be done in the euro group. >> goodbye to the head of the finance minister since 2005. he spent most of his time deal width democratic crisis and says he is eager to understand that over to somebody else. but apart from designating a new head little else of substance is on the agenda. tell leave a pressing decision on a bail out for cyprus until after elections there. >> since i heard the president has ruled out every form of privatization, i am in a b
the revised opening date of october this year. over one billion euros more could be needed for the project. it was one disaster to many for klaus wowereit. after a crisis meeting, the mayor of berlin resigned from his post. he has come to represent the continued failure of a project which has been delayed yet again. wowereit not give any information about when the airport will finally be open for business. >> a new deadline cannot be given at the moment, as we have made clear. it will be considered by the supervisory board. work on that will be continued as before, but further steps need to be taken before a new deadline can be given. >> the board has reportedly known about the delay for weeks. wowereit's opponents are not happy about that. some say it is time for him to go. >> at this point, it must be said that klaus wowereit is no longer fit for the job, especially if it is true that he left the public in the dark for weeks, leading as a -- leaving us a disaster that will cost hundreds of billions of euros or more. >> beyond 2014, there is little indication when the new hub might open i
opening date of october this year. over one billion euros more could be needed for the project. it was one disaster to many for klaus wowereit. after a crisis meeting, the mayor of berlin resigned from his post. he has come to represent the continued failure of a project which has been delayed yet again. wowereit not give any information about when the airport will finally be open for business. >> a new deadline cannot be given at the moment, as we have made clear. it will be considered by the supervisory board. work on that will be continued as before, but further steps need to be taken before a new deadline can be given. >> the board has reportedly known about the delay for weeks. wowereit's opponents are not happy about that. some say it is time for him to go. >> at this point, it must be said that klaus wowereit is no longer fit for the job, especially if it is true that he left the public in the dark for weeks, leading as a -- leaving us a disaster that will cost hundreds of billions of euros or more. >> beyond 2014, there is little indication when the new hub might open its doors. >>
. the problem is, of course, that he has euro skeptics breathing down his neck in britain in his own party, and i think he is banking on germany and france in particular wanting very much to keep britain in the club, which, of course, they do, but i think he may be puckering too high. the german business community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting d
the european politicians and believing in the euro project, are you? >> well, i was. breaking up, wouldn't be here -- >> you're going to tell me that you're convicted on the aussie/dollar. >> no, i'm not convicted. i'm admitting that i've been wrong. we think aussie is terribly overvalued and that's the problem, frankly. >> good to have you on. plenty more to come from you. the ecb is going to keep its interest rates at a record low today. that's what we expect, anyway. the markets will be listening to the delivery tone of mario draghi's delivery. silvia wadhwa is back at her delivery post. 2013 [ speaking foreign language ]. >> everything is going to stay the same. the ecb hasn't got anything to do right now. they've pretty much said everything on track, probably the best, cheapest intervention they had so far was the program. every month announced again. we stand ready to act, but so far they haven't had to do anything because nobody has asked for an omt program yet. but the market believes that the ecb is there as the backstop. so far, that was very successful. in terms of anything el
. they're about to repay hundreds of millions of dollars in emergency loans sending the euro to a 11-month high. currency investor axle merck says the euro could be the rock star this year. he is here to explain. tracy: this blowup capsule the future of space? you heard it about had here first last week. the head of the company that makes nasa's new experiment will tell us how the thing works. and how it is expandable as to inflatable. ashley: there is your space lab right there. tracy: but it is top of the hour. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides on the floor of the exchange. >> all right. good way to kick off the hour. let's just get to the markets. i think we'll save ourselves. let's take a look here at the dow, the nasdaq and the s&p. as we noted we've been sitting here at five-year highs and not too far off all-time highs. look at dow industrials. 13,881. you are. our high of the day was 13,887. these are the highest levels we've seen in five years. of course our all-time high, there it is right on cue, closing high, 14,164 and change. we're not too far
. equities worldwide joined in the rally. european shares hit a 20-month high. check out the euro stoxx 50. the dow jones is lapping up the attention. the euro is trading down at the moment. >> now to other news, portuguese -- the president of portugal has asked the country's constitutional court to review the government's disputed budget for this year. he said he was concerned about whether it fairly distributes the burdens of portugal's economic reforms. it includes tax increases and welfare cuts. he signed the budget, despite opposition. he said that was to avoid harming the country's economy. >> the economic exports and the chancellor have warned about of times ahead. when you look at the nation's unemployment, the picture looks pretty good. >> 2012 ended with more people working than ever before, and that after six years of consecutive games. >> the number of people in worked in germany is higher than ever, despite soaring unemployment in many other european countries. new figures show a stable german job market. the number of employed has been rising steadily. in 2012, 41.5 million p
/dollar, 11.6236. euro/dollar, 1.3166. kind of where we were yesterday. asian markets in china and japan will be catching up on news on the u.s. fiscal cliff deal. we'll get december sales figures from japan's retailing. the owner of stores are set to release its q1 earnings today. samsung electronics is expected to post its q4 earnings guidance. that's all on the agenda in asia. but what investors are to do with what we've got so far this year? joining us now, nicholas. these are the classic risk off day yesterday. how do you categorize it and what it means for -- >> well, i mean, obviously, you know, i think it's important to be clear that this was a rally not based -- based not on what the deal did, but what the deal undid. clearly, the good news is that the u.s. americansfully avoided an even bigger fiscal issue. but, you know, i think clearly it shows how low we've actually sunk in the realm of investors expectations when the markets are actually rallying on essentially muddling through. and this is a well trodden path. it's a fairly familiar tale. and we've obviously seen it in the
euros in debt. the treasury's funding this year is being outlined in madrid as we speak. as we get details on that, we'll absolutely bring them to you. we're talking about nations showing up and saying, give us the help. but spain hasn't even had to go that far. >> the spanish base can get some of on their money if they declare official emergencies. what they're trying to do is to avoid saying we really need the help, we're in trouble. all these countries, as the situation continues, it's clear they won't appear to be the only ones to call the situation off. and the spanish are aware of the fact that everyone else is aware of. we can deal with these countries. spain itself is a significantly different issue. this is a european problem, a potentially fatal one, but one that the spanish isn't really up to. >> can we still get beyond the german elections before there is any activation of the omc? >> we're talking about -- >> or can we go everywhere? >> the issue with the omt, if you're a central banker's performance, it's all these acronyms and different names. it's worth bearing in m
the australian dollar, canadian dollar, singapore dollar and the euro will be the strongest currencies going forward. the reason is -- david: as good as gold though? >> gold will be the best every time. no question about that because even the australian reserve bank which i would say australia is a very strong currency, a lot of inflows in the small capital market, but even they, the reserve bank of australia cutting rates. they are all going to go down somewhat against gold but on a relative basis some currencies will do better than others. >> where does the u.s. dollar fit into all of this, michael? >> we're going to see i think a year of two halves of the u.s. dollar. first half of the year, continued dollar weakness. the second half of the year i think we will see the dollar gain some ground against the euro, certainly against the yen. david: michael, one thing that scares a lot of people, we saw at different times where one country tries to make its export goods cheaper by devaluing their currency and its neighbor will try to do the same and there will be a war back and forth and eventu
in the euro zone picture than fundamental change in europe. second, there's a crisis that competitiveness is other nations across the world sora had. and third, there is a gap between the e.u. and its citizens which has grown dramatic way in years. it is democratic accountability in consent that is yet particularly cute way if we don't address these challenges, i do not want that to happen. i want the european to be a success and the relationship between britain and keeps sna. that is why i'm here today to acknowledge the nature of the challenges we face and to set out how i believe the european union should respond to them and what i want to achieve for britain in its place within the european union conservative nature of the challenges for me. there are some serious questions that will define the future of the european union and the future of every country within it. digging in is changing to help fix the current scene that has profound implications for all of us, whether in the single current era not. britain is not in the single currency and are not to be. when you do yours don't have
is down in general. the dax loses 1% at the moment. the euro stoxx 50 is down by 0.75%, waiting for wall street, opening up significantly lower, and the dollar -- the euro is also significantly down. and at air berlin is to cut 900 jobs in the next two years. that is one in 10 of its workers, but it has not said which jobs will be going. >> berlin has been making a loss for years, and the job cuts are part of a plan to save 400 million euros. berlin says it wants to focus on its most profitable routes in germany, switzerland, and austria. during the cold war, germany's bundesbank took a bet by soaring gold reserves around the world and left in there after the collapse of communism. >> last year, official auditors point out that official stockpiles abroad have never actually been counted. >> plans are afoot to bring the bars back home, or at least some of them. >> at least he knows what he has in his hands -- his golden globe is nothing more than a thin layer of 24 karat gold covering up something much less precious, and there is no doubt about the quality of the gold in the bundesbanks e
the euro touching a two week high in intraday trading and the u.s. dollar index posting slight gains after lawmakers approved a last minute fiscal cliff deal but the political showdown is far weeks away one of the best ways to make money in the currency market this year. liz: last week we had somebody who said buy the south african rand. we have a senior for ren currency strategist and they have got some ideas. before we get to your favorite picks let me tackle the dollar. every time we do quantitative easing, that tends to be dollar negative, very low rates. we don't have a strong dollar at the moment in trade, but what do you think about the u.s. to rar right now? nick, you first. a bit of a mixed picture. easing will be nech for the u.s. commodities and euro. so maybe the dollar will hold up against those currencies. david: chris, what about you, what do you think about the dollar. >> i have to be in agreement with our fellow guest there. when we look at the dollar specifically. we're here race to the base globally. specifically with the bank of japan and potentially later in the year w
tonight but it is still holding at 12991. eurostoxx 50. euro trading down $1.3194. >> secretary of state henry clinton in the hospital due to a blood clot from the concussion she's a reporter earlier this month. >> she is under observation and will be in the hospital at least until tuesday. she is 65 years old. she has stated that she will be stepping down next month. the egyptian pound continues to fall against the u.s. dollar despite financial authorities tried to hold it from sliding. mohamed morsi expects that it will stabilize. >> political turmoil has sent worried egyptian scrambling to change their currency into pounds and dollars. they are imposing controls on how much cash can physically be carried out of the country. >> the latest attempt to stabilize the currency has had little impact on it slide. beside reserves in its currency auction, the egyptian pound falling to a new low. the currency have been losing value since the unrest began. two major factors are a drop in tourism and in foreign investment. many egyptians fear their cash will continue to fall in value causing a run
news, we'll get to that. reaction to the economics in the euro, as you were. >> a reminder, europe can be somewhat close to zero this year, output same as last year, maybe down if we get a decent follow in from the states, maybe clawing back to zero. with the gap between the two, the divergence is the greatest that i've seen since the start of the euro in the '90s. so this is not improving. >> economic divergence is great. market performance is something entirely different. >> yeah. money has to go somewhere. investors, investors around the world are looking for yield. the u.s. investors are looking for yield most of all. they sell the dollar, they buy stuff with yield. this morning, if -- if italian government debt has more yield than other things, then apparently that's just the job. so the euro is likely to go up to 1.34 against the dollar in this move. dollar/yen higher, equities higher. a risk on morning without anybody overthinking it. >> exactly. with the yields being slightly lower than they were this morning as part of that move. the house of representatives passing a bill lat
higher on the bund yields. sannish yields back over the 5% mark. on the currency markets, euro/dollar is at 1.3361. dollar/yen pulling away from its nine-month highs at 88.70th at the moment, as well. that's where we stand in europe. sixuan has more for us from singapore in the asian session. >> sure. thank you, ross. asian markets were a bit of a mixed bag. the shanghai composite gained .6% after yesterday's 3% job. since then, numbers were boosted by china's top security official who said beijing could lift the quota for investors to invest in the mainland markets by as much as nine times. environmental stocks surged. aerospace stock took off on an upbeat industry outlook. the hang seng finished marginally in the red. oil majors and telcos were the market laggers. persisting weakness in the yen boosted exporters. meanwhile, in technology shares wait on south korea kospi ending lower with 1.2%. in australia, the asx 200 ended just a touch below the line. miners were weaker. more on that from our guest later in the show. back to you, ross. >> thanks for that, swish won. catch y
. cheryl: one of the things we look on a daily basis during the market hours is what the euro is doing versus the dollar. always surprised me that the euro never went below like a $1.22 or so against the dollar. now you have the pound. i know you don't like the pound. so i'm curious kind of how you're playing that over in europe right now. >> it's been very interesting. just a year ago, everybody thought that the euro was going dramatically lower, sub 120, 115. i think the major aspect to that is what was it in relation to? we were talking about it in relation to the dollar, and the fed kept on printing money. and the ecb in contrast really has not printed money. they are not injecting new funds into this, whereas what i think is going on with sterling, you know, they are going to probably be the brink of triple dip recession come this friday in the fourth quarter gdp figures. their economy is not doing very well. they will probably have to stimulate that economy going forward. and probably talk about further asset purchases out of them over the next couple of months. cheryl: i have pl
bankrupt. very soon if the entire country had gone bankrupt. due to the structure of the euro zone where countries without a central bank behind them needed -- bailout of the banks and where the banks needed to continue lending money to bankrupt states, -- there was a domino effect because of the banks that were untrustworthy and the untrustworthy countries that they were associated with. this was the point in which the european union refused to realistically look at the situation. they decided that it was better to act, that it was just a crisis of public debt, and they did not -- instead of accepting that they had a poorly designed a currency union, they decided to implement austerity packages to ponte economies that were on the brink of bankruptcy. securing their default, in this way they created a recession that was not necessary for us to have. and they insisted in doing. at the cost, at great human co cost. and at a terrible cost for democracy. ladies and gentlemen, understanding here before you today, and i'm very sorry, but i'm going to say but i have to say this, none of these l
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
. will israel bomb iran and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slo
different. this stay in business. guess what, the euro hit the world stage. you remember this? eleven european countries can together to create the world's second largest economy with nearly 300 million consumers. it closed at a dollar. did not stay that way. the euro consists of eigt. and silver paper bills with $0.77 for every dollar. currencies replaced by the euro include the french franc, italian lira, and the german deutsche mark. for those of you curious, it was not accepted until two years later because it failed to meet all the required conditions like being solvent. they probably should have read thought that decision entirely. made its debut on the stay in business january the fourth 13 years ago today. the investors sick of other people making decisions for them they stop believing in mutual funds. the truth behind these next. ♪ grew up in a small town and when the rain would fall down ♪ ♪ i'd just stare out my window ♪ ♪ dreaming of what could be and if i'd end up happy ♪ ♪ i would pray i could breakaway ♪ ♪ i'll spread my wings and i'll learn how to fly
the dollar. concern about the strength of the euro overall could be a threat. undercurrent to the u.s., which looks like to be a negative one. >> the big macro, everything out of japan, not so great. but the united states banking story, i think, is as you mentioned, carl, is it a real u.s. economy, what is the read on it. people are doing better. and this is a section that was terrifically performing in the s&p last year. and you could argue, wait a second, it's run ahead. but it's not selling off today. i thought people thought it would sell off. we're not getting that kind of judgment. >> a lot of up moves on the back of goldman sachs earnings. take a look at the financials. [ bell ringing ] >> taking a look at the open here. no surprise. oh, look, apple is higher by 1.9% in today's session. helping the nasdaq in an up trend. cutting apple to set to perform. a lot of the reasons we heard before, but apple will have bottomed, either yesterday, or today. calling the bottom in shares of apple. remember, on the way up, in september, they're worried about the impending pop on apple. making the m
cliff, is euro going to explode, so many covers of the euro bursting into flames. >> is japan going to get washington, d.c. into the sea or will this incredible debt burden just crush them? and the fact is that for the last four years, all of those risks, every single one has been overstated, overstated by people in the marketplace. emerging markets are actually much more unstable than that and yet. >> they are thought unstable. >> they are responsible to for two-third of the world's growth, about three quarte by e e of the decade, and yet these are countries that are much more volume tile, volatile and much more opaque. >> rose: let's talk about who they include, china, india, brazil, and turkey and -- >> some of them are doing reasonably well, some include the bricks but three of the bricks bricks are facing head wind greater than we have seen in the united states, not brazil, which is developing increasingly becoming more regularized but in the china and russia, and i go back to the beginning. >> ros the risk is what going to hpen to them? >> the risks are different for differen
prices this week, tle say that really when we look at it in terms of euros, we look at extreme weakness in the gold market here, down about 1.5% so far this week. even with the strength we have seen in the euros. that lets you know there is still some weakness here in the gold market. we are seeing profit taking pretty much across the board in metals complex. but another factor that may be contributing to the fact that we are seeing some weakness in gold is that traders are favoring platinum particularly this week going into 2013. looking at the white industrial metals as the place to be in really helping to supply hopefully create a rally that will continue for the next several months. back to you. >> thanks, sharon. rick santelli is tracking at the cme. we see the yield curve on the 30-year can be how are they doing today, ricky? >> this goes to the point. everyone is concerned if you are thinking rates aren't going up because they have. but they haven't really gotten traction at critical levels. so you look at one-week chart of everything. last week we closed at 109 and a 10 and yes
long. euro/dollar, who cares about that one today? let's talk more about china. we'll head out to hong kong for in-depth analysis. intel giving investors the jitters with a disappointing forecast and a massive increase in capital spending. we'll look at those figures just after 10:20 central european time. 16 minutes later, we'll head out to bangor to talk to the ceo of wipro. >>> and the hostage crisis continues in algeria. we'll have the latest news right after the break. stay with us. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back to the program. a spokesman for the british foreign office says the uk government has received no words that the hostage crisis in algeria is over. most of the reports suggests dozens might have been killed during a rescue operation carried out
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
equities at a five-year high, the euro rallying so prices being lifted by this different influences. melissa: thanks for coming on. we have another truth even if it is not what you want to hear. he made it sound good even though it is bad news. lori: anybody can understand behind the price target. that is a given. it makes it a little bit easier to digest. melissa: it still does not ease how much you're paying at the pump. facebook fourth-quarter peak district of the downgrades roll in. if the company's strategy working? lori: and the drugmakers, the big pharma names. stocks getting beaten down. and competition from generic. but there is still reason to be optimistic. next. . ... melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange and our own nicole petallides. what have you got. >> i'm looking at a market here that has been somewhat mixed. nasdaq is managing to squeeze out gains the dow dropped below 13,900. some names names weighing on the dow, united health care, bank of america. market breadth actually as i look at it, a
kellogg has disturbing job news from london tonight. >> the euro zone unemployment average reached all-time high of 11.8%. up from 11.7 in october. in country like italy, the situation is particularly dire. youth unemployment registered to 37%. >> here they are lined up with jobs accusation center. >> i don't have any trust in my country. absolutely not. no way out. we have our backs against the wall. either you leigh, if you stay here you are condemned. >> some blame the austerity measures that led to violence across the continent for aggravating the employment situation. greater unemployment comes diminished spending power so you get a vicious circle. still, despite the fact that improvements aren't happening quick enough. the leaders of the 27 countrys leaders from the different political parties learned to reach con ken sus. for example on banking union. >> the leaders have come together to change the system in ways they hope will not only stabilize the euro but lead to longer term growth. >> the euro zone need to do more to convince investors they are business friendly. unless it
of the euro currency. boy, we went from basically trading a 133, now to trading 131, and today is a big down day. one market that actually is getting a little bit of a breath, but nothing on the scale of what the dollar and some of the other currencies are gaining on the euro, the dollar/yen. the yen has improved marginally today. but we're still on 87 handle on the dollar versus the yen. you want to pay attention to foreign exchange. we still have some other data today. the minutes we'll get later will be scrutinized, especially considering, you know, federal reserve and how it figures into a post-cliff presealing debate. >> i'm glad you brought up the euro. dennis gartman did that earlier this morning and we didn't talk about it at the time. what do you think is happening? why has the euro turned around here? >> well, to me, i think that what the euro represents, or what the relationship between the euro and other currencies represent continues to be exaggerated by shifts in the ultimate dynamics of trying to score the economy. then you had in the big position growth that we've seen, and t
think germany has done what was necessary to al w allow -- to make it clear that the euro is here to stay, and that's been a tremendous relief for the markets. so calm has returned. the european banking system, the interbank market, has revived so there's a general sense of let's say almost euphoria that the crisis is over. i think that is somewhat premature. because the fundamental internal inconsistencies in the dis-tim have not been addressed, and actually, therefore, you face political dangers. the euro is transforming the european union into something very different from the original conception which was a voluntary association of equal states, and instead of that, the financial created a two-class system where the euro, the creditors and debtors and the creditors are in charge. the political situation i think is going to get worse. i think the next year, next two years perhaps, are going to be very cuffy if the european union survives forever. i don't think europe can live politically with are a situation where there's are a center, namely germany, and countries like italy a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 299 (some duplicates have been removed)